I had this story from one who had no business to tell it to me…

…is the way in which the story begins. This is another classic feature of a ripping tale. The entire idea of either a story discovered in some old dusty piece of furniture, or the relation of events from someone. We see this in stories like the Sherlock Holmes books, and many others. What I’ve always enjoyed about authors using this manner to begin a book is the scope that it gives them to add into an existing body of work many years later. You can write a “new” Holmes story by claiming that your great uncle left you some mouldy old bureau that had a secret drawer with a manuscript tucked inside!

Tarzan is beginning well. As is usual with stories from the time period, non Caucasoid races are not faring well. With this genre you have to really exercise your ability to take things in context of the time no matter how distasteful they can sometimes be. The same applies to suspending your disbelief when it comes to our hero’s ability to teach himself to read from merely finding books in the cabin. My mantra when I read these sorts of books is to “read like an 8 year old” and this is not a slam on the kids! I wish I could treat everything the way that they do sometimes!

Here is a *LINK* to a great Tarzan related site that also contains information about the author and his family.

I’ve just passed the point in the story ( at 3 in the morning, thank you very much insomnia 😐 ) where Jane Porter has come into the story. The best part about this section of the book is when her father and his assistant wander off into the jungle and get chased by a large cat. Hilarious.

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Published in: on June 13, 2010 at 9:24 am  Leave a Comment  

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